Praying at Man Mo Temple



Hello, my loves! Today I would like to share with you the experience I had at the Man Mo Temple in Hong Kong. As Hong Kong and especially the part of town I live in is extremely modern you can sometimes forget that you are in Asia at all. When walking down Hollywood Road and chilling at the little coffee places there, eating burgers and shopping at cool design shops you rather believe you are somewhere in the US or maybe London...until you walk a little further and find yourself infront of the Man Mo Temple (124-126 Hollywood Road, Sheung Wan).

The Man Mo Temple is the biggest still existing of its kind. Two gods are worshipped there - the god of literature (Man) and the god of martial arts/war (Mo). That's why students used to go there before their exams to pray for good results (so glad I don't have to do exams anymore!).

I'll try to explain some rituals buddhists do when they are at the temple:


Bowing
Worshippers put their palms together and bow infront of the gods to show their respect for them and their teaching. Another option is to bow with palmes turned upwards which represents wisdom and compassion.


Lighting Incenses
Lighting incenses is the highest form of showing respect to the gods. It trains worshippers to concentrate on one object and let go of mental afflictions as well as material desires. This practise guides them the way to spiritual development.


Altar Offerings
You will often see tables laid with fresh fruits and flowers. Worshippers place these items upon the altars in appreciation for the god’s teachings and to receive their blessings. This is most common on the Chinese New Year’s Eve, when thousands of people come to the temple with offerings, to thank the gods for a safe and harmonious year.

Tying a Ribbon
At the Man Mo Temple you can get two kinds of ribbons - the red one for wealth and career and the green one for health. You write your name on it and tie it to a wall next to the altar and the gods may provide you with what you need in that field.


Ringing the Bell 
The ringing of the bell produces what is regarded as an auspicious sound. It produces the sound Om, the universal name of the Lord. There should be auspiciousness within and without, to gain the vision of the Lord who is all-auspiciousness.

I had a lot of fun discovering a different religion and taking part in the rituals. I hope I explained everything correctly, if not correct me please. 
Praying - no matter what religion you belong to - is always a good idea to ground yourself and focus. Through praying (or meditation if you are atheist) you can put some things into perspective and find peace when struggeling with something I believe.

This said I advice you to take some time this Sunday to go into yourself. I promise the upcoming week will be more productive.














Blouse: COS

3 comments :

  1. woww amazing!

    http://blondieanchors.com

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  2. was für ein wundervoller Post!
    Als ich im Sommer in Singapur war, ging es mir genauso - man könnte fast vergessen, dass man eigentlich in einer kulturell ganz anderen Welt ist, aber an manchen Orten findet man sie doch noch und das fand ich ganz besonders inspirierend! Es war wundervoll eine so andere Kultur kennen zu lernen!

    Wünsch dir noch ganz viel Spaß in Hong Kong!

    Alles Liebe, Theri
    von theriswardrobe.com

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  3. Hach wie toll. Wunderbare Bilder :)
    Liebe Grüße
    Fiona THEDASHINGRIDER.com

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